Everything is driving me to distraction these days. I can’t focus. So, rather than knuckling down on writing my next book, I thought I would surf the internet for some clues to my malaise. And, sure enough, with enough diligence, I found some interesting information. According to Nir Eyal, distraction is how we avoid dealing with feelings such as boredom, loneliness, insecurity, fatigue, and uncertainty.

Hmm. I’ve got those emotions going for me these days. I’m: 

  • Bored sitting at home all day.
  • Lonely because I can’t hang out with family and friends.
  • Uncertain because danger lurks out there in all forms: COVID, the flu, terrorist bombs, civil unrest, texting drivers, yellow jackets, fire ants, the boogeyman, and flying pigs just to name a few.  
  • Tired of worrying about politics and the hot weather.
  • Insecure because I’m a little rotund and worried that others will not appreciate my writing.  

When you begin to feel sidetracked and start your avoidance plan by checking email, texts, browsing social media, or eating, stop, and do an inventory. What is really going on? Why do you feel a compulsion to avoid feelings that are surging within you? 

Once you’ve figured out what it is, be kind to yourself as you would a friend. Everybody falls for some type of distraction. If life were perfect, we would not push to grow and change. Only with growth and change do we flourish.

What are your priorities are in life? Carve out time in your schedule to advance what is important to you.

Avoiding something that you know you need to do? Try the ten-minute rule. Set an appointment with yourself and spend at least ten minutes on the task.

Lastly, try the flip side technique. Look for the positive in everything. Your car was totaled? Give thanks that you survived.   

 

Eyal, Nir.  “How to be indistractable” retrieved September 4, 2020, from https://psyche.co/guides/to-become-indistractable-recognise-that-it-starts-within-you?utm_source=pocket-newtab

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